Winnipeg woman billed for outstanding rent says her concerns she was being undercharged were ignored

By | July 11, 2019

A Winnipeg woman who says she told her landlord she was being undercharged is now being asked to pay outstanding rent.

The woman lives in a low-income housing complex for seniors and received a notice saying she owes nearly $1000.

It’s money Renee Tober, 66, doesn’t think she should have to pay.

Tober lives in a one-bedroom apartment in the Lions Manor affordable housing complex on Sherbrook Street.

She said Manitoba Housing covers a portion of her approximately $800 per month rent leaving her to pay $400, but that’s not what she’s been paying.

Tober said only $285 each month has been coming out of her bank account through direct deposit.

“They were undercharging me,” said Tober. “I kept paying $285. Nobody said anything until July 5th of this year.”

She said when she told Lions Manor three times last August she was being undercharged her concerns were ignored.

“I wasn’t in error, as far as I’m concerned I did the right thing to save this whole conundrum of errors,” said Tober.

When she was charged $400 dollars for rent on July 1 of this year she went to Lions Manor staff to find out why.

What followed was a letter dated July 5, saying she has an outstanding balance of $920.

“I live day-to-day, I’m on a fixed income, I shop at thrift stores, I go to food banks; by the time I pay my rent, my bills – there’s nothing left,” said Tober. “I have no idea where I’m going to get the money from.”

CTV News tried contacting Lions Manor multiple times over the past three days regarding Tober’s concerns.

When reached by phone Thursday morning Lions Housing Centres Property Manager Priscilla LaBossiere said she can’t comment.

Tober said Lions Manor told her she can pay the overdue rent through installments but Tober doesn’t think she should have to pay at all.

“Why did it take them a year to figure all this out?” said Tober. “I tried to rectify it right from the start and I think that they should swallow it as far as I’m concerned.”

A spokesperson for the Residential Tenancies Branch said landlords and tenants should first work together to resolve issues involving a tenant being overcharged or undercharged.

If that’s unsuccessful it’s recommended tenants contact the Residential Tenancies Branch to a initiate an investigation.