Winnipeg musician Sierra Noble loses Facebook following after account is hacked

By | May 22, 2020

Sierra Noble, a singer-songwriter and fiddle player in Winnipeg, has developed quite a following after performing in the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and opening for the likes of Bon Jovi and Sir Paul McCartney.

Noble gained more than 30,000 followers on Facebook over the past 15 years. But when she woke up one morning last week, they were all gone — and she might not get them back.

“It was just this horrifying message of, ‘This content is unavailable,'” Noble said while on CBC Radio’s Up To Speed on Friday.

“I’m quite tech savvy … and I did absolutely everything I could think of to figure out what was going on, and I had no more access.”

To Noble’s understanding, someone hacked into her account and ultimately deleted her Facebook page.

“It was quite devastating because I really cherish that connection with my fans and the ability to connect with them on a really personal level,” she said. “I just feel so sad that it’s gone.”

Facebook is arguably the best way for Noble to get her music out, connect with fans, and catalogue a career, she says, and that’s especially true now as she cannot go on tour because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Noble was about to release music for the first time since 2016, so the timing of her page’s deletion adds impact to the blow, she said.

“It’s notoriously difficult to contact a real person at Facebook, so that’s been a challenge,” Noble said, but she’s reached out to other people she knows who are trying to help in the meantime.

“I’m still hopeful, but in the case I won’t be able to get it back, I have started a new one and there’s been a pretty good response to people joining the new page.”

Facebook told CBC News it is looking into the issue.

As upsetting as the ordeal has been, Noble is trying to approach it with a positive mindset and finds herself appreciating each person following her journey.

Noble’s website along with her Twitter and Instagram accounts are still intact.

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